Justin Jordan to work with the Australian Army’s handler of the official 6th Battalion mascot, Blue.

Jordan will be working with Blue and also guiding Blue’s handler to help groom the Australian Cattle Dog into the ideal Army mascot.

Who is Sgt Ridgeliegh Blue III?

Blue is the official mascot for the 6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment. The unit is an infantry battalion located at the Enoggera Barracks in Brisbane that was raised on June 6, 1965. The battalion has deployed on operations to Vietnam, East Timor, Iraq, and Afghanistan.


The history of ‘Blue’ stems back to 1975, when the CO of the Battalion ordered the Bn 2IC to obtain a ‘Blue Heeler’ as the unofficial battalion mascot. The 2IC purchased MA001 Pte Ridgeliegh (Blue) for a total of $30. Yet, on the 28th Oct 1976 ‘Blue’ was accidentally run over and the Battalion was left without their mascot.

That was until 1978, when the next ‘Blue’ was given to 6 RAR by 8/9 RAR during an exercise in Shoalwater office Bay as somewhat of a joke. The wretched old dog was obtained from the local pound by the 8/9 RAR Padre at a cost of $1.50 and promptly named “Wart” by the troops. The dog was then left as a surprise gift in the dug-in command post during a ‘relief in place’ activity. The CO at the time, LTCOL Mick Harris, MC, kept the animal and upon return to the barracks, ordered the dog cleaned, wormed, and marched in as the battalion’s new mascot. Since then, there have been eight Australian Cattle Dogs in the role of ‘Battalion Friend’, with the current being a healthy male who has been with the Battalion since 2011.

Blue’s Training

In recent years, Blue has become a little reactive to certain stimuli, so Jordan will be working on keeping Blue focused on being the perfect Army mascot.

Blue’s training will concentrate on walking nicely in parades and staying focused on his handler in loud or distracting environments. Jordan will also be working closely with Blue’s handler and coaching him on his techniques to ensure that Blue’s training is consistent.

Having Troubles with Your Dog?

It is not uncommon for dogs to be reactive to certain stimuli in their environment, preventing them from walking or behaving properly. Training your dog so that they have the right walking habits can be a difficult, and sometimes a daunting task. Many people stop taking their dogs for walks as often as they should because it becomes too difficult to keep them under control.

If you’re having troubles walking your dog, or simply struggling to control their behaviour, contact Jordan Dog Training today. Teaching your dog to respond to your cues need not be as complicated as you think.