Category: Tips

Dark haired puppy looking sad with puppy eyes

Reducing Separation Anxiety in Dogs

Separation Anxiety in Dogs

Separation anxiety is a feeling of loneliness that is experienced when being separated from a parent, carer or loved one. While it is most often seen in children, it is also a very real feeling that our pets and especially dogs experience.

The inevitable truth of owning a dog is that you will have to leave them alone at times, no matter how much we don’t want to! Many dog owners must leave for work for upwards of 8 hours a day, meaning their dogs are left without social interaction and exercise for a large portion of their day.

 

Effects of Separation Anxiety on Your Dog’s Behaviour

Separation anxiety in dogs can cause bad behaviour and a decline in the mental health of your dog. One of the most common forms of bad behaviour that becomes apparent in dogs with separation anxiety is excessive barking. Dogs with separation anxiety often resort to barking or howling out of boredom, but other common problems that arise include escape attempts, digging in the yard or chewing. While separation anxiety can present itself in several ways, the resulting behaviour is often confused for your dog suffering from boredom.

 

Preventing Separation Anxiety in Dogs & Puppies

So how can you prevent separation anxiety in dogs and puppies? There are several ways in which you can help to ease the effect of separation anxiety for your dog. With some changes in your own behaviour and the help of some very clever dog products, you can provide your lonely dog with some relatively simple solutions to separation anxiety symptoms.

 

Separation Anxiety Dog Training

By changing your own behaviour slightly while leaving your dog alone, you can help your dog to deal with separation anxiety.

 

1. Stay assertive

Stay calm and collected while leaving your pup alone for the day. Dogs are very perceptive animals, so by displaying anxious behaviour yourself before leaving your dog will act accordingly.

 

2. Don’t make a big deal about leaving

Make sure that you show your pup the affection that it deserves long before you leave the house. By communicating to your dog that leaving the house is not a big deal, they can become more accustomed to spending time without you!

 

3. Socialise and exercise with your dog before leaving

By tiring your dog out a little through exercise, you can encourage your dog to spend its time alone resting. This is good behaviour to encourage, as your home time is seen as the more social time for you and your dog to enjoy.

 

Dog Toys for Separation Anxiety

There are also dog toys available online that can help you to reduce separation anxiety in your dog. These toys often provide stimulation and mental training for your dog, occupying them for hours. These can come in the form of chew toys, cuddle toys or slow-release treat games.

One of our favourite separation anxiety dog toys are Lickimats. By spreading soft food over the mat, dogs will spend hours slowly licking this off.  This provides your dog with a tasty treat while also stimulating them and keeping them busy. You can buy a Lickimat from our online store here.

 

How Jordan Dog Training Can Help with Separation Anxiety

If you’re struggling to help your dog with their separation anxiety, you can enlist the help of an expert dog trainer from Jordan Dog Training. The team offers home dog training services that can be targeted specifically to help with separation anxiety and other behavioural issues. Contact the team online today.

Travelling with dogs

Travelling with Your Dogs

Travelling with your dog over the holidays is a great way to include your best friends in your adventures. Some important things to bear in mind are warm weather safety and car safety.

read more

3 Tips to Desensitise Your Reactive Dog

How to desensitise a reactive dog

In dog obedience training, there are often many different approaches to the same problem. At Jordan Dog Training we recommend the following approach for working with reactive dogs as it does no harm (emotionally or physically) to the dog and it uses a science-based understanding of canine stress and dog behavioural learning.

What do we mean by “reactive dogs”? This refers to more than just a nuisance habit such as jumping up on people in excitement. It’s a label that we give to dogs who perceive certain situations as a threat and react instinctively to try and protect themselves. To people, it often looks like an overreaction, but to the dog it is very real. read more

Breed Spotlight: Labrador Retriever

Considering buying a Labrador? Here are some facts and information on the breed to get you started.

Appearance

Labradors are a robust, athletic looking dog with a tail that will clear your coffee table. Their coat may be black, yellow or chocolate. Labradors typically weigh between 25 to 36 kilograms, and females are usually smaller than males.

Image result for labrador field

Temperament

Labradors have a cheerful, steady temperament that makes for a wonderful family dog. However, lab puppies in particular can be very bouncy, so care needs to be taken around small children. They are notoriously mouthy and need clear guidelines about what they may and may not chew.

Labradors are intelligent and eager to please, making them very responsive to training. They love company and will likely want to follow you around the house and rest at your feet.

 

Exercise and space needs

The Labrador Retriever is a large sporting dog, originally bred to work with fishermen and hunters. They are happiest when they have a job to do and when they get plenty and varied exercise, including walking, running, swimming, hiking or retrieving. While the don’t need a large yard, they do need plenty of opportunities to stretch their legs and engage their mental faculties.

Grooming

Labradors have a short coat with a dense undercoat that does shed, particularly when the seasons change. A good quality de-shedding tool or curry comb will help to reduce the amount of hair drop around your house, but it cannot be avoided entirely.

 

 

 

red dog on the union field

How to get a dog like Red Dog

Introducing Red Dog—the charismatic and spirited official junior mascot of the Queensland Reds.

Red is an extraordinarily energetic and affectionate pooch who never fails to entertain and bring a smile to his two-legged fans.

So how do you get a dog like Red Dog?

read more

bupa blog

Our Advice for a Great Family Dog

A great family dog is a wonderful thing, but it doesn’t happen by accident.

Think about it; if you were thrown into a new home with a bunch of new people, you’d act strangely too. Training a good family dog is all about patience and a soft, slow approach which brings your new family member into the fold one step at a time.

Take a look at a few extra expert tips, to ensure your new dog fits in quickly with your family.

read more

Do not alpha roll your dog

The “alpha roll” is an obsolete technique that some dog trainers still employ. It involves forcing a dog to roll onto its back and pinning it to the ground in an attempt to assert physical dominance over the dog.

read more