Author: Justin Jordan

Positive Reviews Help Others: Thank You

We get so many positive reviews for Jordan Dog Training across Facebook, Google My Business, and those who choose to email us directly. We love that our customers are happy enough with our services that they want to share their experiences with others. With so much negativity in the world today it’s even more important to pay attention to the positive messages. We recently got a review on our Facebook page by a lovely woman called Amy.

She wrote:

“We got so much out of our puppy preschool experience with Jordan Dog Training. Justin is such a conscientious, experienced trainer, and a true lover of all kinds of dogs! As new dog owners he really reassured us through the process and was incredibly supportive. All the sessions were super informative and helpful. We spend so much of our time googling and youtubing tips for training but that all paled in comparison to being able to speak to a proper trainer in person. We would recommend this class to anyone and everyone; it’s helped us and our lil boy immeasurably. Thanks Justin!”

 

 

As always, we offer ongoing support to the pups that are educated through our puppy preschool. We’re always available on email or via phone if anyone has any questions. We love hanging around after class to answer specific questions and share our knowledge and we hope that our advice has made you a more confident dog owner if you ever attended one of our classes.

Thank you for everyone’s ongoing support.

 

If you’d like to leave your own review, please visit our facebook page, or you can submit a testimonial.

No ham bones for dogs

Keep your dogs safe this Christmas

What not to feed your dog this Christmas

Many of us love to indulge over Christmas, and it can be very tempting to include your dog in the Christmas cheer. Unfortunately, many of our Christmas favourites can make our dogs sick.

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Travelling with dogs

Travelling with Your Dogs this Christmas

Travelling with your dog over the Christmas holidays is a great way to include your best friends in your end of year celebrations. Some important things to bear in mind are warm weather safety and car safety.

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English Staffy

Breed Spotlight: Staffordshire Bull Terrier (English Staffy)

English Staffy

Considering buying an English Staffy? Here are some dog facts and information on the Staffy breed to get you started.

English StaffyAppearance

English Staffies are a well-muscled, robust looking dog with a short, smooth coat, broad head and strong tail. A medium-sized dog, English Staffies typically weigh between 11-17 kilograms and stand 35-40 cm tall at the withers.

Their coat may be red, fawn, white, black, blue or brindle, and may be mixed with white to varying degrees.

 

TemperamentEnglish Staffy lying on a couch

The English Staffy is a courageous, highly intelligent and affectionate breed. Staffies are very human-oriented and loyal, and want to be with you all the time. At the extreme, they can be clingy and occasionally prone to anxiousness when left alone. They are a versatile dog who will happily join the family on the sofa for a movie, trips to the beach, car rides, and may do well at dog sports such as flyball, obedience or agility.

English Staffies are happiest when indoors with the family. While known as a “nanny dog” due to their love of children, they are best suited to families with children aged over eight years as they may knock smaller children over with their enthusiasm. As with all dogs, they should not be left with children unsupervised.

Although not known as excessive barkers, English Staffies are vocal: they will often be heard snoring, snorting, grunting and “singing”.

English Staffy PuppyExercise and space needs

English Staffies can thrive in any type of home as long as he gets daily exercise. They are notorious diggers, so it is important to ensure that fences are secure by laying a concrete trench or burying chicken wire at the bottom. The best prevention from escaping is to provide your English Staffy with a vigorous walk every day, particularly if they will be left home alone for any length of time.

An energetic and high-spirited breed, they thrive on vigorous athletic activities. All dogs have different preferences – some will love chasing a ball, others will excel at dog sports, others might enjoy taking their human for a jog. You should find a suitable activity for your English Staffy to give them an outlet for their energy and to maintain their muscle tone. They will also benefit from some strong chew toys such as a frozen Kong stuffed with suitable treats and veggies.

 

GroomingEnglish Staffy Puppy

English Staffies have short, easy-care coats. They shed a low to moderate amount, but this can be minimised with regular brushing. A bath once or twice a month will keep them smelling fresh if they spend most of their time indoors.

 

 

 

Need help training your new English Staffy puppy?

We can help you hit the ground running with our Puppy Set-up, or help you take the first steps in training your puppy at our Puppy Pre-School.

 

If you liked out dog facts and information about the English Staffy breed, then check out our previous blog on the Labradoor Retriever.

So you’ve got a reactive dog?

How to desensitise a reactive dog

In dog obedience training, there are often many different approaches to the same problem. At Jordan Dog Training we recommend the following approach for working with reactive dogs as it does no harm (emotionally or physically) to the dog and it uses a science-based understanding of canine stress and dog behavioural learning.

What do we mean by “reactive dogs”? This refers to more than just a nuisance habit such as jumping up on people in excitement. It’s a label that we give to dogs who perceive certain situations as a threat and react instinctively to try and protect themselves. To people, it often looks like an overreaction, but to the dog it is very real. read more

Breed Spotlight: Labrador Retriever

Considering buying a Labrador? Here are some facts and information on the breed to get you started.

Appearance

Labradors are a robust, athletic looking dog with a tail that will clear your coffee table. Their coat may be black, yellow or chocolate. Labradors typically weigh between 25 to 36 kilograms, and females are usually smaller than males.

Image result for labrador field

Temperament

Labradors have a cheerful, steady temperament that makes for a wonderful family dog. However, lab puppies in particular can be very bouncy, so care needs to be taken around small children. They are notoriously mouthy and need clear guidelines about what they may and may not chew.

Labradors are intelligent and eager to please, making them very responsive to training. They love company and will likely want to follow you around the house and rest at your feet.

 

Exercise and space needs

The Labrador Retriever is a large sporting dog, originally bred to work with fishermen and hunters. They are happiest when they have a job to do and when they get plenty and varied exercise, including walking, running, swimming, hiking or retrieving. While the don’t need a large yard, they do need plenty of opportunities to stretch their legs and engage their mental faculties.

Grooming

Labradors have a short coat with a dense undercoat that does shed, particularly when the seasons change. A good quality de-shedding tool or curry comb will help to reduce the amount of hair drop around your house, but it cannot be avoided entirely.

 

 

 

Positive reinforcement dog training

To treat or not to treat

Many people object to using rewards in training, particularly food rewards, which is the most common tool in the positive reinforcement toolbox. The primary objection is because the reward is seen as a “bribe”, creating dogs that need food to work.

Rewards come in many forms. Training a dog without offering any rewards, whether food, praise or play, will not be motivating for your dog and is likely to be damaging to your relationship with them.

Food: bribe or positive reinforcement?

Dog receiving a treat in positive reinforcement training

If rewards (food or otherwise) are used correctly, they are not a bribe but a reinforcer. A bribe is something that is presented before the desired behaviour to prompt them into action. A dog that is trained using bribes will generally only perform the behaviour if there is a reward in front of him first.

A reinforcer is something that is given after the desired behaviour by the dog. The dog understands that the reward appeared after they performed the behaviour, which reinforces the behaviour. A dog trained with positive reinforcement will perform the behaviour in the expectation or hope of a reward, but they don’t need to see or smell it ahead of time.

Luring – during early stages only

Treats are often used as a “lure” in the very early stages of training a specific behaviour. The food is used to guide the dog into a particular position.

The trick is to use an empty hand lure as soon as possible after the dog begins to grasp of the mechanics of the behaviour. You should still reward the behaviour, but don’t show the dog the treat until after the dog performs the behaviour – keep the treats in a pocket or treat pouch.

The next stage is to transform the empty hand lure into a hand gesture; again, only presenting the reward once the dog performs the behaviour.

Fading out the food

Once the dog is reliable in performing the behaviour, you can reward less frequently or sporadically. However, if they start to show reluctance to perform behaviours that they know perfectly well how to do, (after ruling out any medical issues), consider whether you should be paying (reinforcing) your dog for more of the work he does for you, particularly in distracting environments.

Distracted dog?

Another important tip for preventing accidental bribery is to ensure you have your dog’s attention before giving a cue. People often wave a treat under the dog’s nose to get their attention, unwittingly bribing their dog. Try making a silly noise to get your dog’s attention instead, or be more animated to gain your dog’s focus. If your dog is too distracted, move your training to a calmer environment until your dog is at a stage of training where he can remain focused on you without resorting to bribes.

My dog doesn’t work for food

If your dog doesn’t work well for food, it may be because he’s getting too much of it already or he has free access to it whenever he wants. If you load your dog’s meal up in a treat pouch instead of a bowl, he will soon be motivated to work for it. Food dispensing toys are another great way of encouraging your dog to work for his daily meals.

Another consideration is what types of food are you using in training. Some dogs are not that excited by kibble but will work well for soft, meaty treats. A trick to supercharge kibble is to place it in a bag with a couple of chunks of hot dog. The kibble will take on the smell of the hot dog. Remember, whatever calories you use as rewards should be subtracted from their meals to avoid weight gain.

Non-food rewards

However, some dogs will be more motivated by a tossed ball or a tug on a rope. The same considerations apply to these rewards. If you have to show your dog the ball before they will sit, the ball has become a bribe. The more effective sequence is to cue the behaviour, and only present the ball when the dog performs the behaviour. If the dog doesn’t perform the behaviour, it hasn’t been reinforced enough in the earlier stages. Take your training back a step to a calmer environment with more frequent positive reinforcement.

‘Stop the 77’ program to reduce risk of dog bites

When 77% of bites come from their family or a friend’s dog, that’s an opportunity for education that anyone who loves kids or dogs simply cannot ignore.

We’ve been nominated for the Telstra Business Awards

A humbling thank you to those that nominated Jordan Dog Training for the Telstra Business Awards.

Pine Rivers Dog Training Club Open Day 12 July

Justin Jordan will be a guest judge at this fun-filled event for dog lovers! Who wouldn’t want to judge which dog has the best fancy dress, waggiest tail, or most appealing eyes?

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